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Home for Haircuts

Jeffery Warren, founder and owner of Signature Kutz, says he tries to make the Durham-based barber shop feel “homey, real comfortable. Like a living room.” The four barbers of Signature Kutz have been providing haircuts to the local community and beyond since 2010. The shop is a staple business in East Durham, an area that Warren describes has seen great revitalization in the past few decades, which has in turn made the barber shop a safer place. Due to gentrification, however, much of the surrounding neighborhoods have struggled. Warren says he knows that there are many low-income and single-parent households so the barbershop adjusts its prices to make haircuts accessible to all families. As a result, the barbers have developed many deep relationships with their regulars and even act as father figures or wise counsel for some younger customers. “We try to keep it family oriented, " Warren said. "You see kids grow up from a baby, then see their sons grow up, until they graduate from highschool, too. Building relationships with the customers... to me that’s the best part of it.” 

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Davison_Hope_HomeforHaircuts-01

A customer receives the final touches on his beard after his hair is cut by barber Jeffery Warren on August 31. Warren hopes the barber shop can be a place for customers to relax and feel at home.

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Davison_Hope_HomeforHaircuts-02

A packed waiting room is the usual scene at the barber shop on Fridays and Saturdays. The shop is open from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays and often the barbers will be on their feet the whole time, taking appointments and walk-in customers alike. Often families will lounge in the waiting room together, watching television and talking with each other as they wait for their haircut.

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Davison_Hope_HomeforHaircuts-10

Brower sweeps up after cutting a customer’s hair, preparing for the next customer.

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Davison_Hope_HomeforHaircuts-01

A customer receives the final touches on his beard after his hair is cut by barber Jeffery Warren on August 31. Warren hopes the barber shop can be a place for customers to relax and feel at home.

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Forever in the Family

Farming runs in the family for John and Betty Sue Yow, having both grown up on a farm within their own families and eventually taking over the family business as a married couple of 58 years. The 305 acres of land which they reside on now originally belonged to Betty Sue’s grandfather and has been in the family for over 230 years. Once a dairy farm, the Yows now raise grass-fed cattle and sell Angus beef at local farmer's markets during the week. With John’s deteriorating health, they have had to rely more on their two sons to maintain the farm. “This is a family farm. We hope that somebody will continue to farm it,” says Betty Sue.

Faces of Main

Central North Carolina's small town of Carrboro has been called many things: colorful, creative, hipster. But what people often remember the most when they leave is not the exterior of each individual shop that lines Main Street, but rather the workers inside who make Carrboro so vibrant and welcoming. Faces of Main documents the workers of Main Street in Carrboro who work hard every day to make the town an exciting place to be.

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20190304_06_Davison_SELECTS-2 copy

"I've been here 31 years," said Barry "Sid" Keith of Surplus Sid's costume store at 309 E Main St. in Carrboro. According to Keith, Surplus Sid's is one of the oldest of four establishments still remaining in Carrboro. Most days Keith will greet customers while sitting outside his store amongst the various articles of clothing, furniture and knick-knack objects. "Come back if you ever need a costume or weird piece of frankenstein furniture," he said as a goodbye on February 26, 2019.

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20190304_06_Davison_SELECTS-3 copy
20190304_06_Davison_SELECTS-3 copy

As the youngest member of Salon2eleven, Vina Vinluana likes to experiment and keep up to date with the latest color trends of balayage, baby light and ombré. The hair salon, located at 211 E Main St., provides haircut and styling services for both men and women. Vinluana is photographed here on February 26, 2019.

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20190304_06_Davison_SELECTS-5 copy

Brian McGee has been at 116 W Main St. as a guitar repair specialist since it was called the Music Loft. Now he is the owner of Twin House Music, a music store and repair shop which opened in October 2018 and is located at the same space. "I like being my own boss," McGee said on February 28, 2019 about why he likes to work there. He said that he was grateful he was able to keep the same working space and interact with the music community in Carrboro.

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20190304_06_Davison_SELECTS-2 copy
20190304_06_Davison_SELECTS-2 copy

"I've been here 31 years," said Barry "Sid" Keith of Surplus Sid's costume store at 309 E Main St. in Carrboro. According to Keith, Surplus Sid's is one of the oldest of four establishments still remaining in Carrboro. Most days Keith will greet customers while sitting outside his store amongst the various articles of clothing, furniture and knick-knack objects. "Come back if you ever need a costume or weird piece of frankenstein furniture," he said as a goodbye on February 26, 2019.

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Charging Forward

Friday night lights for Northwood High School football is a big deal for residents of Pittsboro, NC. The football team, which hasn’t seen a consistent record for either wins or losses in the past few years, started the 2019 season with new coaches Cullen Homolka and Tobias Palmer. After the team started with a disappointing 0-3 streak, they began to look promising as a competitive team for the playoffs when they won the next four games back to back. After losing the next three games in a row after that, the dream of making the playoffs started to fade. “I felt like we kind of found our identity, but then also I felt like we took steps back when we should have been taking a lot more steps forward,” said Palmer, a former NFL player and Northwood alumnus. “It’s kind of in-between. I feel like guys right now, they want to win, they want to compete on Fridays, but it’s about trying to find that way of being able to finish at the end, whatever we need to finish. It can be tough, but it’s football.”

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NORTHWOOD_FINAL-1

Players take their positions at the start of a home game on November 17, 2019.

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NORTHWOOD_FINAL-2

Clayton Riggsbee pauses in the weightroom in between the various sets of workouts that the coaches plan for the athletes. The weightroom is place where the athletes often socialize and talk about things other than football.

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NORTHWOOD_FINAL-15

Players pack up the bus to head back to Northwood after a loss to Orange High.

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NORTHWOOD_FINAL-1

Players take their positions at the start of a home game on November 17, 2019.

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Davison_Hope_Story01

Betty Sue’s grandparents were the first to farm on the land where the Yows now live and farm themselves.

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Davison_Hope_Story02

Every other day, John and his sons make sure the cows are fed, often four bales worth of hay in the winter months. While Keith maintains some of his own cows, he always helps John with his and when John can he helps Keith.

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Davison_Hope_Story13

Keith, Betty Sue and John’s second son, does much of the maintenance for their farm. Along with working a full time job as a high school woodworking teacher, Keith works on the farm nearly every day before and after his job. Because Betty Sue and John’s oldest son, Walter, has multiple sclerosis, and their youngest son Gary passed away in a car accident earlier in the year, Keith is the main worker on the farm. The family is not sure how much longer they can continue the cattle business.

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Davison_Hope_Story01

Betty Sue’s grandparents were the first to farm on the land where the Yows now live and farm themselves.

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Whole

"Whole" is a magazine concept exploring the experience of being mixed race in the United States.

Tokyo 2020

A visual look at the key components in the Tokyo 2020 Olympics.